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Who Did You Vote For? 
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Post Re: Who Did You Vote For?
Weave wrote:
cocoa wrote:
Gamer Greg wrote:
cocoa wrote:
I thought you live in Chicago?


Not in the downtown area, but the burbs. I'm actually in Will county (south/southwest burbs) which is more dominantly red. Cook county contains the downtown area, and subsequently forces the state to be democratic. If you check out a voting by county, you'll see the entire state is red, except along the lake (Michigan), and this time near the Iowa border. The rest of the entire state is red. Many republicans like myself are upset that a single county forces the entire state to vote for a particular election.

Yeah I see now. Illinois looks more republican than democratic. I probley shouldn't make assumptions but your not nessesarily in chicago which is different. That's what I don't like about the electoral votes. They only focus on the bigger states. Why should, for example, people in Nebraska their vote doesn't count for as much as in like Florida. That's why they should go by popular vote.

I wouldn't say the electoral college is necessarily the problem. The Constitution sets up the electoral collage and how many electors a state has based on population. The Constitution does not, however, explain how those electoral votes should be won. That is up to the states to decide. In this election every state set up their elector system as winner take all. A state could split up their electoral votes between candidates much like Nebraska did in 2008. 4 of Nebraska's 5 electoral votes went to the McCain/Palin ticket while the remaining vote contributed to the Obama/Biden ticket and eventual win. If the larger states such as California, Texas, New York or Florida used a system like this it would eliminate a lot of the controversy surrounding the electoral college while braking up the Democrat or Republican stronghold on key states. This would particularly even up the 55 electoral votes that California has. Instead of the whole state going to the Democrats, Republicans would be able to claim a portion of those votes.
Furthermore in order to switch the Presidential election to popular vote it would take a Constitutional Amendment. Those are sort of difficult to pass. Having the states split up their electoral votes wouldn't take a Constitutional Amendment because, as I stated earlier, the Constitution doesn't state how the electoral votes should be cast among the states, making it an easier solution.


I agree, I think we would get a lot more Republican presidents this way as well. When looking at the red/blue states, the majority are red, the blue ones are just the largest states and some others.

cocoa wrote:
Yeah I see now. Illinois looks more republican than democratic. I probley shouldn't make assumptions but your not nessesarily in chicago which is different. That's what I don't like about the electoral votes. They only focus on the bigger states.


I understand, but it's also a more generic location. Like when you go on vacation and talk with others, you don't say the actual town unless it is a well known town. So I tell people I'm from Chicago, they immediately associate it with IL and have a good idea where that it is. If I say the specific suburb, most people have no idea what state or where that is. So when I run into others from IL, I can dig deeper and explain the burb I'm in since they will be able to associate it since they may have heard of the area. I do commute to downtown Chicago almost daily for work (weekdays), so I am in the downtown area a good portion of the day.

But yeah, it looks like Romney had won the popular vote, but lost the election, similar to how Bush won in 2000 I believe. If we had more states divide up the votes, it would mean more challenges for both parties to try to get the majority of the vote for the state.

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Fri Nov 09, 2012 11:12 am
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Post Re: Who Did You Vote For?
Weave wrote:
I wouldn't say the electoral college is necessarily the problem. The Constitution sets up the electoral collage and how many electors a state has based on population. The Constitution does not, however, explain how those electoral votes should be won. That is up to the states to decide. In this election every state set up their elector system as winner take all. A state could split up their electoral votes between candidates much like Nebraska did in 2008. 4 of Nebraska's 5 electoral votes went to the McCain/Palin ticket while the remaining vote contributed to the Obama/Biden ticket and eventual win. If the larger states such as California, Texas, New York or Florida used a system like this it would eliminate a lot of the controversy surrounding the electoral college while braking up the Democrat or Republican stronghold on key states. This would particularly even up the 55 electoral votes that California has. Instead of the whole state going to the Democrats, Republicans would be able to claim a portion of those votes.
Furthermore in order to switch the Presidential election to popular vote it would take a Constitutional Amendment. Those are sort of difficult to pass. Having the states split up their electoral votes wouldn't take a Constitutional Amendment because, as I stated earlier, the Constitution doesn't state how the electoral votes should be cast among the states, making it an easier solution.

Thanks so much for the refresher on how this works. When we learn this stuff in high school, it tends to slowly go away through the years. lol
Speaking of which, can you remind me how each state's electoral college is selected?

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Fri Nov 09, 2012 12:01 pm
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Post Re: Who Did You Vote For?
hattrick wrote:
Weave wrote:
I wouldn't say the electoral college is necessarily the problem. The Constitution sets up the electoral collage and how many electors a state has based on population. The Constitution does not, however, explain how those electoral votes should be won. That is up to the states to decide. In this election every state set up their elector system as winner take all. A state could split up their electoral votes between candidates much like Nebraska did in 2008. 4 of Nebraska's 5 electoral votes went to the McCain/Palin ticket while the remaining vote contributed to the Obama/Biden ticket and eventual win. If the larger states such as California, Texas, New York or Florida used a system like this it would eliminate a lot of the controversy surrounding the electoral college while braking up the Democrat or Republican stronghold on key states. This would particularly even up the 55 electoral votes that California has. Instead of the whole state going to the Democrats, Republicans would be able to claim a portion of those votes.
Furthermore in order to switch the Presidential election to popular vote it would take a Constitutional Amendment. Those are sort of difficult to pass. Having the states split up their electoral votes wouldn't take a Constitutional Amendment because, as I stated earlier, the Constitution doesn't state how the electoral votes should be cast among the states, making it an easier solution.

Thanks so much for the refresher on how this works. When we learn this stuff in high school, it tends to slowly go away through the years. lol
Speaking of which, can you remind me how each state's electoral college is selected?

The electors are chose by the state legislature. Some states have a primary system when the electors are voted on and then selected based on popularity in the legislature. Electors cannot be people who have already sworn an oath to office and serving at the time. There is a lot of variation between states on the the electors are selected but at the end of the process it is is determined by the state legislature. I would say this is definitely a reason to pay attention to local politics as well as national.


Fri Nov 09, 2012 3:47 pm
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Post Re: Who Did You Vote For?
Weave wrote:
hattrick wrote:
Weave wrote:
I wouldn't say the electoral college is necessarily the problem. The Constitution sets up the electoral collage and how many electors a state has based on population. The Constitution does not, however, explain how those electoral votes should be won. That is up to the states to decide. In this election every state set up their elector system as winner take all. A state could split up their electoral votes between candidates much like Nebraska did in 2008. 4 of Nebraska's 5 electoral votes went to the McCain/Palin ticket while the remaining vote contributed to the Obama/Biden ticket and eventual win. If the larger states such as California, Texas, New York or Florida used a system like this it would eliminate a lot of the controversy surrounding the electoral college while braking up the Democrat or Republican stronghold on key states. This would particularly even up the 55 electoral votes that California has. Instead of the whole state going to the Democrats, Republicans would be able to claim a portion of those votes.
Furthermore in order to switch the Presidential election to popular vote it would take a Constitutional Amendment. Those are sort of difficult to pass. Having the states split up their electoral votes wouldn't take a Constitutional Amendment because, as I stated earlier, the Constitution doesn't state how the electoral votes should be cast among the states, making it an easier solution.

Thanks so much for the refresher on how this works. When we learn this stuff in high school, it tends to slowly go away through the years. lol
Speaking of which, can you remind me how each state's electoral college is selected?

The electors are chose by the state legislature. Some states have a primary system when the electors are voted on and then selected based on popularity in the legislature. Electors cannot be people who have already sworn an oath to office and serving at the time. There is a lot of variation between states on the the electors are selected but at the end of the process it is is determined by the state legislature. I would say this is definitely a reason to pay attention to local politics as well as national.

Ahhh... Yes, local/state politics are just as important. Same for all 3 branches of government. I've always thought the American people need a general slap in the face when it comes to elections, because we put SOOOO much importance on the President but hardly say anything about the House and Senate. Often, it feels as if we think we are electing a king. We expect the President to do all these things, but it is not just up to him/her.

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Post Re: Who Did You Vote For?
hattrick wrote:
Weave wrote:
hattrick wrote:
Weave wrote:
I wouldn't say the electoral college is necessarily the problem. The Constitution sets up the electoral collage and how many electors a state has based on population. The Constitution does not, however, explain how those electoral votes should be won. That is up to the states to decide. In this election every state set up their elector system as winner take all. A state could split up their electoral votes between candidates much like Nebraska did in 2008. 4 of Nebraska's 5 electoral votes went to the McCain/Palin ticket while the remaining vote contributed to the Obama/Biden ticket and eventual win. If the larger states such as California, Texas, New York or Florida used a system like this it would eliminate a lot of the controversy surrounding the electoral college while braking up the Democrat or Republican stronghold on key states. This would particularly even up the 55 electoral votes that California has. Instead of the whole state going to the Democrats, Republicans would be able to claim a portion of those votes.
Furthermore in order to switch the Presidential election to popular vote it would take a Constitutional Amendment. Those are sort of difficult to pass. Having the states split up their electoral votes wouldn't take a Constitutional Amendment because, as I stated earlier, the Constitution doesn't state how the electoral votes should be cast among the states, making it an easier solution.

Thanks so much for the refresher on how this works. When we learn this stuff in high school, it tends to slowly go away through the years. lol
Speaking of which, can you remind me how each state's electoral college is selected?

The electors are chose by the state legislature. Some states have a primary system when the electors are voted on and then selected based on popularity in the legislature. Electors cannot be people who have already sworn an oath to office and serving at the time. There is a lot of variation between states on the the electors are selected but at the end of the process it is is determined by the state legislature. I would say this is definitely a reason to pay attention to local politics as well as national.

Ahhh... Yes, local/state politics are just as important. Same for all 3 branches of government. I've always thought the American people need a general slap in the face when it comes to elections, because we put SOOOO much importance on the President but hardly say anything about the House and Senate. Often, it feels as if we think we are electing a king. We expect the President to do all these things, but it is not just up to him/her.

I would say that the Office of the President have been assuming a lot more power in the past hundred years than it was originally supposed to have.


Fri Nov 09, 2012 4:10 pm
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Post Re: Who Did You Vote For?
Weave wrote:
hattrick wrote:
Weave wrote:
hattrick wrote:
Weave wrote:
I wouldn't say the electoral college is necessarily the problem. The Constitution sets up the electoral collage and how many electors a state has based on population. The Constitution does not, however, explain how those electoral votes should be won. That is up to the states to decide. In this election every state set up their elector system as winner take all. A state could split up their electoral votes between candidates much like Nebraska did in 2008. 4 of Nebraska's 5 electoral votes went to the McCain/Palin ticket while the remaining vote contributed to the Obama/Biden ticket and eventual win. If the larger states such as California, Texas, New York or Florida used a system like this it would eliminate a lot of the controversy surrounding the electoral college while braking up the Democrat or Republican stronghold on key states. This would particularly even up the 55 electoral votes that California has. Instead of the whole state going to the Democrats, Republicans would be able to claim a portion of those votes.
Furthermore in order to switch the Presidential election to popular vote it would take a Constitutional Amendment. Those are sort of difficult to pass. Having the states split up their electoral votes wouldn't take a Constitutional Amendment because, as I stated earlier, the Constitution doesn't state how the electoral votes should be cast among the states, making it an easier solution.

Thanks so much for the refresher on how this works. When we learn this stuff in high school, it tends to slowly go away through the years. lol
Speaking of which, can you remind me how each state's electoral college is selected?

The electors are chose by the state legislature. Some states have a primary system when the electors are voted on and then selected based on popularity in the legislature. Electors cannot be people who have already sworn an oath to office and serving at the time. There is a lot of variation between states on the the electors are selected but at the end of the process it is is determined by the state legislature. I would say this is definitely a reason to pay attention to local politics as well as national.

Ahhh... Yes, local/state politics are just as important. Same for all 3 branches of government. I've always thought the American people need a general slap in the face when it comes to elections, because we put SOOOO much importance on the President but hardly say anything about the House and Senate. Often, it feels as if we think we are electing a king. We expect the President to do all these things, but it is not just up to him/her.

I would say that the Office of the President have been assuming a lot more power in the past hundred years than it was originally supposed to have.

Agreed!

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Fri Nov 09, 2012 4:18 pm
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Post Re: Who Did You Vote For?
hattrick wrote:
JumpingGirraffe wrote:
If any of you voted for Mitt Romney I'm leaving this forum forever. It already had me rattled that it was a close race. 

Don't you live in Canada?? :tongue:
Romney made us fear for our Milk bags.

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Post Re: Who Did You Vote For?
ExiledBlacky wrote:
hattrick wrote:
JumpingGirraffe wrote:
If any of you voted for Mitt Romney I'm leaving this forum forever. It already had me rattled that it was a close race. 

Don't you live in Canada?? :tongue:
Romney made us fear for our Milk bags.

That guy just reminded me of Mr Burns, or, or this guy!



Tue Jan 01, 2013 2:18 pm
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